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20100901
20100930
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
notes. tomorrow night, a conversation with geoffrey canada and david guggenheim. then later in the week, james ellroy, and robert reich would join us with seal. we also will have nancy brinker. tonight, we kick off the week with harold for junior. the former tennessee congressman is now the chairman of the democratic leadership council, dlc, and and he has a new book, "more davids than goliaths." >> everyone should see that. what guggenheim and canada have done, it is inspiring. i hope people see it. >> it is a moving film. one thing i am sure that geoffrey and davis and i i am sure will talk about is that it is anti-union. what do you make of that? >> whether we are finding greater success in one model or the other. i think probably one of the most poignant thing that has been said is it seems our education system that of to benefit adults where it should be squarely and comprehensively how to fix kid'' problems and how to answer the challenges they faced a today, so i love the debates. i am a charter school guy. i am not an anti-union guy. geoffrey, we should scale up what he is doing
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. geoffrey canada is the president and ceo of the harlem children's zone and he is the center of a new project. the sellout -- the film is a look at education in 20th- century america. the film is now open in select cities. "waiting for superman" is coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all a better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. nationwide insurance is on your side. >> and by contributions from their pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: geoffrey canada is the ceo of the harlem tilden's zone. he is at the center of a wonderful new project from davis guggenheim called "waiting for superman." the film is a look at the state of public education in this country. >> one of the saddest days of my life was when my mother told me superman did not exist. i was a comic book readers. i read comic books. i love them. even in the death of the ghetto, you just thought -- in the d
from their pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: geoffrey canada is the ceo of the harlem tilden's zone. he is at the center of a wonderful new project from davis guggenheim called "waiting for superman." the film is a look at the state of public education in this country. >> one of the saddest days of my life was when my mother told me superman did not exist. i was a comic book readers. i read comic books. i love them. even in the death of the ghetto, you just thought -- in the depths of again, you just thought he would show up and he saves all the good people. maybe i was in the fourth grade. my mom said, superman is not real. what do you mean he is not? no, he is not real. she thought i was crying because i thought santa claus was not real. i cried because no one was coming with enough power to save us. kids look at the world and the make certain predictions based on the evidence they are receiving from their peers, from their parents, and from their teachers. from their perspective, the world as a heartless, coldblooded place because, from their side, the
in one of his campaigns, from new hampshire to canada. that really resonated with me. it was a touching, motivating story. there is one by a brain surgeon. he was in emigrant migrant worker, who came over from mexico, and he was a boxer. he really started, not even speaking english, pulling weeds. 10 years later, he was in medical school. if you could imagine that. his message was never quit, and how going from failure to failure is sometimes part of success. i really enjoyed that. interesting way of looking at it, but sometimes you don't always get where you want to go, but it does not mean you are not getting their. -- getting there. tavis: how has your relationship with your father -- when you came on the scene, we got to know your dad first. he introduced us to his girls. how has your relationship with your father changed over the years? he came out first, introduced us to you all, now you all are out front and you really see your father. how has the relationship changed over the years as you have moved out front? >> well, he has gone to some money matches and practices, -- he has g
of daniel or donald. they have an accent over the o. i was born in canada, but we went back to ireland and got green cards and came here. my sister siobahn plays my schizophrenic sister on the show. tavis: it is a family show. >> it was interesting for me because i take acting seriously but do not like to talk about it that way. i do not like to look indulgent. i have my thing i do, but do not prince around and talk about it much. the first time doing things with my sister -- i was so overcome with emotion i could not -- i could not get to scenes. this is kind of a thrilling thing when you are taken by something. it is artifice. you know how the scene starts and ends. when people always say, "i do not know where i went. it is so real," it is real in that it provoked a response when you watched it, but you knew where you were going. it was thrilling because there were moments where we really felt like we were flying, in a way. hopefully, if that resonated with us that way, all you can hope is people feel the same way when they watch it. tavis: apparently, they will. the critics like it.
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)